6 Things Women Should Never Do In A Divorce

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6 Things Women Should Never Do In A Divorce
 
In the crazed battle of the exes (or soon to be permanent exes) we too often tend to act on our emotions. We’re angry. We’re annoyed. We’re upset. We’re devastated. Divorce is like going through death, and it affects more than just the couple: kids, parents, friends – it’s the ultimate division of assets.
For those of you who have or are going through it, you know what it feels like.  It sucks. So, I want to give a few tips to those out there in the arena -especially the ladies. Here are a few things that women should never do in divorce and why:

1. Make the man the bank: If you were not the earner in the relationship and you attempt to turn your ex into a Bank of America during the divorce process, you’re going to get far less in the settlement than you ever would have, than if you showed a little prudence and appreciation. Nothing makes a man more irritated than knowing he’s being used for money. Here he is, in the process of getting a divorce..from you (whether it was his idea or yours) and he has to write you a check for the money he’s earned. There’s no worse feeling than seeing a hard-earned paycheck cut in half and given to somebody who’s constantly belittling and just plain mean.

Whether you put off your career to raise your children or you’re just expecting alimony, it’s important to be thankful for every dollar he gives you because ultimately, you could be in trouble if he didn’t. Showing your gratitude will help you cause – he’ll give you what you need, (if you need it) so you can survive, live and breathe until you can get back to work. Remember, the two of you were married once. Somewhere deep down, a form of love still exists so respect one another for the best outcome.

Related: 5 Signs Your Partner is Using You for Money

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