Emily Blunt & Alison Brie On Love, Exes And ... Passing Gas?

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Alison Brie and Emily Blunt
The female stars of 'The Five-Year Engagement' share on-set mishaps & their own relationship advice.

 

Alison, how do you think your character Suzie and her relationship with her sister, Violet, changes during the movie?
Alison: In the beginning, I think Suzie is just a disaster! She's a total mess, so she comes to her sister for advice. Then, as their lives progress and Suzie makes the best out of her situation, I want to say she becomes more responsible, though it's really just responsibility by circumstance. So, by the end, it's really Violet getting advice from Suzie, and Suzie doesn't give terrible advice!
Emily: I think it's interesting at the beginning that the two sort of screw-ups, Alison and Chris Pratt's characters, they're the ones who actually get it right. Whereas Tom and Violet are waiting for the "perfect" moment at every turn and they keep getting it wrong, and life keeps getting in the way of making them happy. Suzie and Alex go with gut instinct, take the plunge and just go for it, and end up having a really successful and happy relationship.

What would your advice be for having a successful and happy relationship?
Emily: Life is complicated and it's shape-shifting all the time, and you have to be willing to roll with the punches. The main thing—which I found was hard to learn as a British person—is communication. That's a word we're all terrified of in England! (Laughs) If you're in a relationship, you have to talk to each other and be forever generous. The best relationships I've seen of my friends, and hopefully the one I'm in, is that you don't clip each other's wings. You really have to empower the other one to be all they can be. If one partner is stifled by the other's success, that's usually an unhealthy thing. Both people have to have some kind of purpose and identity, because you don't want to end up defining yourself by your association with someone. Emily Blunt On Her Successful Marriage With John Krasinski

Do you have any advice for brides who are planning a wedding?
Emily: Don't have too many cooks in the kitchen. It has to be your wedding. It has to be whatever you want. It's essential, because a lot of the time people get married for other people—for their parents, relatives and friends—and everyone wants the big to-do, the dress and the ring. But, I really think that if you want to get married in your backyard, you should. And it should really be personal to you.

Emily, you and Jason's characters break up and we're left wondering if you're going to get back together. Do you think it's ever a good idea to go backwards and get back together with an ex?
Emily: I've personally never done the 'get back together' thing. Have you, Alison?
Alison: In almost every relationship I've had I've done that! (Laughs)
Emily: I've done the clean break.
Alison: Yeah, and I'm the 'get back together three or four times' type.
Emily: And has it always ended badly?
Alison: Yep! Although, I am still friends with some of them. I believe that a lot of the time when you break up with someone, it's because you have too many differences and it's overwhelming. Then, I feel like we develop instant amnesia where two months go by and you forget all the bad things that happened, and you only remember those really great moments. But, I'm sure in certain circumstances—and what we see in this movie—is Tom and Violet break up for reasons out of their control. They get back together because they are meant to be together and they're overcoming this thing that was larger than both of them. 5 Definitive Reasons Not To Get Back With Your Ex

How is this film different from other romantic comedies?
Emily: We really tried to show a modern couple, where it's actually the girl who has the career and the guy who has to follow her and adjust. A lot of people have asked me questions like, "Do you think that Violet is selfish and career-driven?" And I say, "Hey, if the genders were reversed, this wouldn't even be an issue, it wouldn't even be raised." Even though it seems different for a romantic comedy, I think it's actually representative of what the world is actually like now. My own mother even said, "When are you going to ask me to marry you?" That's how her and my father got married. It doesn't always have to be that the guy is down on one knee.

Tell us: Are you going to see The Five-Year Engagement this weekend?

Photo Credit: Getty

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