Is Solo Sex The Key To The Female Orgasm?

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Is Solo Sex The Key To The Female Orgasm?
As female masturbation becomes less taboo, better sex and more orgasms are sure to follow.

Rewiring the pop culture message couple help. Besides "slut-shaming" sexually empowered women, the zeitgeist often reinforces the masturbation double standard. The Guardian's women's blogger Jane Martinson wrote to this last year in an article titled "The self-love that dare not speak its name":

"From adolescence through to the deathbed, men are allowed to be unabashed onanists… It is the subject of jokes, the basis of entire novels (Portnoy's Complaint) and movies (American Pie), and celebrated as a natural and healthy exploration of sexuality available to men. But there is no parity for women. More often than not, when women in popular culture masturbate, it is often portrayed as a symptom of their deviance. Elizabeth Banks' masturbating character in the film The 40-Year-Old Virgin is also a mildly unhinged lust-addled sex addict; Samantha Jones (Kim Cattrall) from Sex and the City had well documented issues with sex and men; Reese Witherspoon's character in the movie Pleasantville is the "bad girl" from the ‘90s corrupting her sexually innocent ‘60s mother, played by Joan Allen (her subsequent orgasm causes a nearby tree to catch fire); and poor Sally Draper (Kiernan Shipka) in Mad Men earns a slap from her mother before being shipped off to the psychiatrist after being caught with her hands down her pants."

And maybe things are starting to shift for the younger generation. After all, a 2008 Kinsey Institute report shows more than 50 percent of women ages 25-44 have tried vibrators. Despite an expected dose of giggles and euphemisms, sex is something that young adults are talking about more frankly and proactively than ever before. Study: Sex And The City Leads To Frank Discussions About STDs

Twenty-something writer and editor Elizabeth Narins speaks to this in her recent Men's Health article "Women On Top" about us entering a sexual golden age, with men and women bearing equal power and pleasure in the bedroom:  

"By age 11, I was pooling change with my summer camp bunkmates to buy a book called Sex Tips for Girls. When I was at Syracuse University, sex-toy parties were common among sororities. (They're like Tupper-ware parties but more fun.)…Information is abundant and talk is loose. Between 2005 and 2010, the use of profanity (including explicit references to genitals and bodily functions) on prime-time broadcast entertainment TV rose nearly 70 percent, according to the Parents Television Council (the use of "boobs" went up 90 percent in 5 years, and "balls" 200 percent)."

Whether by Jacuzzi jets or TV, young women are going to discover their sexuality. Going forward, hopefully it's something they tackle with information and empowerment rather than ignorance and shame.

*Name has been changed.

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