Has Sex And The City Decreased Sex In The Home?

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samantha jones sex and the city
Did Samantha Jones' sexual exploits discourage real women from hitting the sheets?

Why is being sexless so trendy? Oh, let's blame Samantha.

Wait. Well, first, let's pull back and look at what this trend even is. Erica Jong just penned this piece entitled "Is Sex Passe?" which seems to follow up on the Observer's "Sexless and the City" piece. The Observer blamed the rise of Facebook and the fact that we live in public on the fact that young people are no longer terribly interested in sex, Erica Jong claims that young women place more emphasis on monogamy and motherhood.

Is this even a real trend? Well, I don't entirely know. Have you had sex recently? Like in the past… year? Was it okay? Kind of fun? With noises and stuff? Okay, well, I guess sex still exists and people still have it.

But look, I really believe the answer here comes down, as it so often does, to the fact that we like to be shocked by everyone else's sexual habits. And this is how we get to the part where Samantha swept in and fucked up everything for everyone, by having all the interesting sex.

Oh, sure, you could say that a lot of sexual territory already got trammeled by the feminists of the 1970s. Look at things we associate with that age! Being swingers! Key parties! It was Erica Jong herself who said in Fear of Flying that women fantasized about a "zipless fuck" where you'd, say, just have wordless sex with a stranger in a train bathroom. Which actually sounds terribly awkward, but let's overlook that, and just say that the 1970s were a kooky time when shocking your parents was worth any amount of uncomfortably bouncy standing up train sex.

Read the rest of the article at The Gloss: Why The Sexless Trend Is So Trendy

Written by Jennifer Wright for The Gloss. Image courtesy of AFP/MAX NASH.

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This article was originally published at The Gloss. Reprinted with permission.