6 Ways To Spice Up The Missionary Position (So It's Not So BORING)

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Mission impossible? We think not.

Missionary is the Jan Brady of sex positions — dismissed as plain and boring, never picked first, forever in the shadow of flashier poses such as girl on top, from behind, and reverse cowgirl. But it shouldn't be.

"Most people don't realize that because missionary position allows for a lot of variation, it exposes your nerves to a wider range of sensations and is surprisingly orgasm-friendly," says Lori Buckley, Psy.D., a licensed sex therapist in Pasadena, California.

Which explains why 33 percent of women say missionary is their favorite position, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. (Guys dig it, too — being on top typically lets them control the pace and prolong their orgasm.)

Amp up the experience with these hot new twists to missionary position.

1. Rock the Boat

Missionary gets flack for not allowing for much clitoral contact, but one simple adjustment can remedy that. Experts call it "the coital alignment technique" (AKA "the cat").

While he's on top of you, have him scoot up two inches so that the base of his penis is directly aligned with your clitoris, says sex therapist Ian Kerner, Ph.D., author of She Comes First. Then, with your legs wrapped around his thighs, press your genitals together so you create pressure and counterpressure, moving in a gentle rocking motion (as opposed to in and out). Your clitoris will let you know when you've got it right.

2. Go Deep

While he's on top, draw your knees toward your chest (you can grab the back of your thighs for support) and place one or both of your feet flat on his chest.

"Doing so puts the tip of his penis in direct contact with your cervix, a sensation many women find pleasurable," says Sadie Allison, D.H.S., author of Ride 'Em Cowgirl.

3. Take Control

Just because you're on the bottom doesn't mean you can't call the shots. Throw one of your legs over his shoulder while you keep the other one stretched straight out on the bed (or bent, with your foot planted firmly on the mattress). At your own pace, keep switching your legs so that one is over his shoulder and the other is on the bed. The up-and-down motion of your legs creates a pleasurable sweeping sensation over the G-spot zone, says Kerner.

4. Bring Him to His Knees

Awaken a whole new set of nerves by tweaking the angle of penetration.

"Lie down and have your guy kneel between your legs while sitting back so that his butt is resting on his ankles," suggests certified sex educator Lou Paget, author of The Great Lover Playbook. "He can use the strength of his thighs to push forward and thrust, or grab your hips with his hands to control the pace."

This sex position stimulates your lower vaginal wall, which contains nerves that are often neglected during plain old missionary. If orgasm still eludes you, grab a vibrator or squeeze a little lube onto your fingertips and give yourself a hand as he thrusts.

5. Straighten Up

It sounds counterintuitive, but keeping your legs closed can actually boost your pleasure. Once he's inside you, bring your legs together (keep them straight) so that his legs are on the outside of yours. Then squeeze your thighs together to create friction against his shaft and your vaginal lips while he grinds (not thrusts) into your goods.

"The entrance to the vagina — namely the outer and inner labia — is packed with nerve endings that are activated by this type of shallow penetration," says Allison. You can also reach back and grab your headboard or place your palms against the wall for even more resistance and friction.

6. Give Yourself Props


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The hottest sex toy is sitting right there on your bed.

"Place a pillow under your lower back to tilt your vagina upward," says Paget. "His penis will hit that top frontal wall where the G-spot is located." For extra pleasure, try placing your palms on his butt to control the pace and rhythm of movement.

This article was originally published at Women's Health. Reprinted with permission from the author.

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