Weather And Love: Which Season Is Sexiest?

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A couple in the summer.
Summer seems to be the steamiest time of year, but is it the the best season for lasting love?

It seems pretty appropriate that most people think summer is the steamiest month and sexy time cools down in the winter, doesn't it?

According to MSNBC, the Associated Press conducted a poll of over 1,000 randomly selected adults to gather statistics on how weather affects our romantic lives. The numbers were taken in late January when snowstorms crashed through the Northeast. As it turns out, most people weren't feeling the love during the winter chill.

Just eight percent of those polled picked winter as the sexiest month, whereas summer was the most selected at 44 percent. The responders weren't all that fond of winter for hitting the dating scene either, with just nine percent choosing the season as the best for mixing and mingling. Summer Fling Checklist

Most people enjoy warmer days, as they feel happier and more romantic. True to the spirit of spring's new beginnings, people selected this season as their favorite time to "fall in love, begin dating someone, meet someone new or get married."

But while spring may be a crowd favorite, it wasn't the time of year that most people ended up in a serious relationship. The season for commitment is apparently the one dubbed least sexy: winter.

Of those polled who were one half of a committed couple, although not married, the smallest percentage of people said they started dating in the season of flings, summer. Most lasting bonds actually began during the deep freeze of winter. So, is cold weather the key for cozying up and getting closer? According to the AP, it's very possible. 7 Winter Romance Rules

Maybe we should stop hating on winter so much, as the season seems to produce the most long-term matches. Clearly, this is a case where Mother Nature knows best.

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