Is Infidelity In Our Genes?

male and female scientist examine dna results
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Science proves that facing infidelity or a faithful marriage has nothing to do with genetics.

Getting married can seem like such a crapshoot: Will you wind up with someone like the stalwart, not-found-anywhere-on-Earth hero of a Nicholas Sparks novel—or a guy who, down the line, reveals himself to be a total cad? And what part does genetic predisposition play?

This week, the Well column in the New York Times examines the scientific factors determining the likeliness of a partner to cheat. One hot topic indeed. Lemondrop: Sandra Bullock's Breakup Proves Bad Boys Are Always Bad News

Specifically, reporter Tara Parker-Pope compares a handful of new studies, including one that seems to debunk the influence of what's previously been called the "infidelity" gene, a variation in the gene that regulates vasopressin—a male bonding hormone. This new study says that possessing such a glitch might lead to a less stable partnership, but it doesn't necessarily mean you're cozying up to a Tiger. Lemondrop: Sex Addiction—Medical Condition Or Convenient Excuse?

Read the rest on Lemondrop.

Written by Susannah Edelbaum for Lemondrop.

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Expert advice

Save your breath because you only need two words to make him commit.
Are you REALLY thinking about their happiness?
If you keep finding yourself in heartbreaking, dead end relationships, listen up.
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