Is Cheating Inevitable?

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is cheating more natural than staying faithful?
We know why it happens. But does that make it OK?

John Edwards. Justin Timberlake. Tiger Woods. With new stories of infidelity popping up every day, is it any wonder we sometimes feel as if we're only biding our time—stomachs clenched—until we catch our partner in the act? After all, it's inevitable. Right? 

Just last week, over at Huffington Post, Jay Michaelson put the question to his readers: Is monogamous marriage an anomaly? He then reviewed the history of marriage: "Truly traditional marriage, after all, is polygamy. This is what the Bible instructs, and it's been the dominant familial arrangement in the Western world for longer than any other form, including nuclear-family monogamy. Kings had their concubines, noblemen had their mistresses and kept women, and the rest of us—well, we had the world's oldest profession." Why Powerful Men Cheat

So, yes. We have to acknowledge that marriage did, indeed, originate as a sort of business transaction. We know that—scientifically speaking—most species aren't naturally monogamous. We also know that it's silly to look to one man to satisfy all of our needs, expecting him to be our sun, our moon, our stars. We get it, already. Monogamy is unnatural.

But despite all of this, and despite the flutter we sometimes get in our stomachs when we see another man's dimples, leading us to imagine an alternate life with an alternate man, we want monogamy to work. We need to believe that it can.

Can it?

Next: Can monogamy work?

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