Other Yankee Wives Hate Kate Hudson

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Kate Hudson Alex Rodriguez
Derek Jeter's girlfriend told to play nice with A-Rod's lady.

Kate Hudson and Alex Rodriguez have been dating happily since last November, but there's friction: The wives and girlfriends of other Yankees can't stand Kate, according to Page Six, and the cold shoulders they've been throwing Kate's way have gotten so vicious their ballplaying boyfriends are getting involved. "The Yankees told the girls to be careful who they spoke to about Kate," a source told the New York Post's gossip page. "They are concerned about the ramifications for the players."

The mean girl ringleader seems to be shortstop Derek Jeter's gorgeous ladyfriend, Friday Night Lights actress Minka Kelly, who's reportedly peeved by Kate's over-the-top antics in the field-level boxes. "There's been visible coldness between Minka and Kate," a source close to the team told Page Six back in August. "I don't know if it's a personal thing, or just an extension of the ongoing A-Rod–Derek Jeter rivalry. But people are choosing sides." Kate frequently sits with the wives of players A.J. Burnett, C.C. Sabathia, Jorge Posada, and Johnny Damon, and if that doesn't sound like the lineup of an awesome Bravo show in the making, then we are not world-renowned television programmers. Real Housewives Of Atlanta Shocker: The Details

 

Minka and Derek have reportedly been dating quietly for over a year, but you wouldn't know it from watching Yankees games. Unlike Kate, Minka prefers to root on her man from private seats outside camera range, and is rarely photographed with him. Although rumors circulated in August that she and ten-time All-Star Derek were engaged, the low-key couple refused to comment.

Kate, on the other hand, has been seen more on the SNY network this season than closer Mariano Rivera, and some Yankee fans speculate that she's the reason for Alex's recent hot streak. "Obviously, he is most likely not thinking about [Kate] while he is in the batter's box," Duke University sports psychologist Gregory Dale told the New York Daily News. "But it can provide an overall sense of calm and confidence that frees him up to do what he does best."