Vaginas With Teeth And Other Sex Myths That Bite

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oral sex myths
Oral history is to blame for one of sex's biggest misconceptions.

We love supermarket tabloids as much as the next person. In fact, we're guilty of holding up the line at Gristedes on several occasions, all in the name of celebrity gossip.

When it comes to sex myths, however, the headlines aren't always as transparent as say, a Spencer Pratt mishap. MSNBC recently published a list of sexual misconceptions that, quite frankly, scare us more than a Heidi Montag music video. 

When The American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology reported that a benign embroid tumor containing teeth was growing in the wall of a woman's vagina, a universal eww was heard around the world. For those of us who rely on CSI for our forensic case studies, you still may have read about "vagina dentata" on Wikipedia where the finger points to folklore as the root of all misconception. Put your mouthgard back on the night stand. This one's false.

According to SmarterSex.com, some people are also under the misconception that brushing your teeth after oral sex can prevents STDs. While we love a fresh mouth more than anyone, brushing actually causes microscopic tears to form in your mouth, thus making bacteria transmission easier. If ever there was a reason to start flossing, this is it.

Whomever told you blow jobs will whiten your teeth was most likely referring to the big smile on their face that resulted from a not so little white lie. Sad but true, according to Talk Sex with Sue Johnson, some people are under the impression that ejaculation is a main ingredient in teeth whiteners. If that was the case, Monica Lewinsky would be the spokesperson for Colgate.

While there is some truth behind the fact that teeth and blow jobs don't mix, it's safe to say that these three myths are all talk.

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