Morning News Feed: Friday, November 14

By

Morning News Feed: Friday, November 14
Happy people have sex, divorce causes death, deathly revenge, teen-mother envy.

Happy Friday!

A 30-year Springer study found that happy people are watching less TV and having more sex. Surprise, surprise.

Reuters Health reported a study this week that parents of a child with ADHD are almost twice as likely to divorce before the child’s 8th birthday. 

Also likely to divorce: couples with monstrous mother-in-laws. In Italy, a man was granted divorce for his nagging mother-in-law. He's seeking an orphan as his next partner, according to The Daily Times in Pakistan.

There’s even worse news for divorcees this morning. The Local reports a Rostock University study done in Germany found that people who get divorced die an average of nine years earlier than those who don’t.

Speaking of death (sorry, it's a dreary Friday!) here’s some news on old people: The Times of India reports that a London survey found that older men and women who came of age in the sixties are more likely to cheat… and less likely to regret it

Regret may be abundant in the news today, in part because revenge is (apparently) in.  According to The Herald Times, a 22-year old woman who allegedly used her SUV to hit her boyfriend after a fight is facing a $45,000 fine… and prison. 

Cross your heart and hope to die you’ll love me forever? Well, the Ledger-Enquirer reports that one man in Georgia must have taken his ex-girlfriend’s vow literally. He was convicted for stabbing her in the heart with a 3-foot long sword. Ouch.

The tendency towards revenge affects men and women alike, but The World Economic Forum’s global report on gender equality looked at the status of women in 130 countries, finding that women are less likely than men to get top political and decision-making roles. 

GET MORE ARTICLES LIKE THIS IN YOUR INBOX!

Sign up for our daily email and get the stories everyone is talking about.

Must-see Videos
SEE MORE VIDEOS
Stories we love
FROM AROUND THE WEB
  • The more money, the more fights? Couples who earn $20,000 or less argue less frequently than couples who earn $250,000-500,000.