Why Sarah Palin's First Dude Drives Women Wild

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Why Sarah Palin's First Dude Drives Women Wild
Could Todd Palin's sex appeal win his woman a seat in the White House?

Type "First Dude" into Google, and you'll find, as I did, various sites hawking buttons, T-shirts, and bumper stickers emblazoned with "One Smoking Hot First Dude," "Todd's Babe," and "I'm voting for Todd!"

The last time we saw such a hormone-induced uproar over a political spouse was Dennis Kucinich's smoking-hot wife, Elizabeth. He gave scrappy, diminutive men everywhere a glimmer of hope. 

The hope baton has been passed to driven, powerful, alpha females. The ones who have been so unlucky in love, never able to keep a man. Outwardly, to her friends, she blames her time-starved, career-driven schedule ("I just don't have time for a relationship!), but inwardly, she knows that's it's hard to find a good man. And by "good man," I mean someone who's not emasculated by or envious of his partner's success.  

Yet now, with the help of Sarah Palin, those women can hope for someone like Todd to come along. Regardless of your political stance, Sarah and Todd are paving the way for a new breed of couple. In a country rampant with divorce, it's usually the successful female/supportive male combo that's first to hit the rocks. But Sarah and Todd, high school sweethearts who married young and quickly filled their home with a brood, seem to defy the odds. How do they do it?

Todd Palin's equal parts masculinity and sensitivity might have something to do with it. Not to say that Sarah has nothing to do with their successful relationship, but Todd is making the ladies on the campaign trail swoon. And he might just help his wife earn a spot in the White House this fall. 

Here, the top five reasons Todd Palin is driving women wild and might help Sarah a very happy woman come November 8th. 

More braun, less brains. He's no nerdy scientist, no slick corporate exec. He's a union guy. Angela Merkel has a chemist; Sandra Day O'Connor had a fellow lawyer. Sarah Palin's guy worked in the fields for oil giant BP before landing his current union rep job. As People reported, he's "a tough, blue-collar outdoorsman who calloused his hands with two decades of hard work at the North Slope oil fields.