Yes, Say Anything

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Yes, Say Anything
Vulnerable men: why we love them.

vulnerable menThe subject of vulnerable men has come three times this week. It's purely coincidence, but deserves a post, nonetheless.

Lloyd Dobler: attractive. Jean-Claude Van Damme: yuck.

There is something extremely attractive about vulnerability. Not the "I'm an emotional wreck; fix me" kind of basket case, but the guy with a touch of self-deprecation and a dose of humility. Like he's letting you in a on a little secret. Take for instance one of our writers, John Meils. His latest piece, "The Magic of (Other People's) Weddings," delves into the male mind while attending, you guessed, wedding. He's honest and funny, without being trite or condescending.

Another favorite? Dan Eldridge. He's taken us through the ups and downs of an open relationship in "Marriage Without Monogamy." We spoke about our favorite and least favorite he has submitted thus far. My favorite is his most recent, which we'll be posting shortly. (We just received it, so give us a few days) The jist: Things aren't always perfect in open relationship world. And he doesn't always say or do the right thing. He falters, and we appreciate him for it.

Luckily, my husband falls into this category, too. (Not the faltering, but the vulnerability. Okay, the faltering, too.) I remember when we first started dating, he admitted that he checked his email numerous times, hoping something from me was waiting in his inbox. We all do that, just not everybody admits to it.

No one likes smug. Or overly confident. Guys may think those qualities exude a type of undeniable prowess. But I think they indicate just the opposite. Thankfully, we have guys like these (above) to prove that the opposite sex is equally human.

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