Divorce Mediation: Is It Right for You?

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Divorce Mediation: Is It Right for You?
Collaborative divorce means splitting without lawyers.

Divorce mediation is a growing trend among couples who want to split but without the carnage a divorce can bring. In a collaborative divorce a family mediator acts as a neutral party and sits down with the couple to iron out the details of their split. The mediator also gives the couple advice on the legal aspects of their divorce.  This cooperative form of divorce is a growing trend. MSNBC reports that couples are increasingly turning to collaborative divorce or divorce mediation. 

In contrast to mediation, in which divorcing couples entrust a resolution to a single neutral mediator, collaborative divorce involves the use of attorneys for each party, often joined by other expert consultants. But the lawyers, instead of sparring, pledge from the outset to work together in crafting an outcome that is fair to all. 

"Most clients in a dispute are looking for an honorable peace, not war," Boston lawyer David Hoffman wrote in recent op-ed for The Christian Science Monitor. "Collaborative lawyers can be just as zealous about seeking such a peace as litigators are about victory in the courtroom." 

This peaceful form of divorce can also make the break easier for the kids involved as, in theory; their parents will do less fighting. Yet, critics are worried that divorce mediation makes divorce too easy and that ending a marriage should be difficult. 

Yet, with divorce rates on the decline and collaborative divorce on the rise, that criticism doesn't seem to hold a lot of water. 

If you are interested in a collaborative divorce FindLaw offers a helpful FAQ that will answer all of your questions, such as, is mediation cheaper than using lawyers to handle a divorce? 

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