New Trend: Marriage Mentoring

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New Trend: Marriage Mentoring
Marriage isn't easy, sometimes you need a little help.

Marriage MentorsBack in the day, people lived pretty close to where they grew up. They may have gone off to college or war, but they typically came back home. Then the '50s started and there were suburbs. And people could come back from college or war and move somewhere that felt like home. And then people started getting divorces. Between the broken homes and the distance from their parents, most couples are missing out on positive role models and reliable sources of marital advice. What’s a couple to do? Same thing as what people looking to be successful in other arenas do, they go online to find someone who’s kicking ass at what they want to do and shadow them.

That’s right, marriage mentors have slowly been gaining popularity. Fox's sitcom Til Death capitalizes on a similar scenario; the older couple indoctrinates the youngsters in the minutia of married life. Sure the show is basically parody, but there’s a thin line between homage and parody.

Most of the popular places to find mentors have a decidedly Christian bent (such as MarriageMentorSite.com), but if you’re not into that Jesus stuff, just track down one of the older couples from Project Everlasting and stick to them like glue. Or you can check out The Marriage Mentor Manual from married PhDs Les and Leslie Parrott, the Marie and Pierre Curie of marriage mentoring.

We bumped into a quote from Sean Combs (Diddy, as it were) on Bossip: “I don’t know how marriage works. If you’re raised by a married couple, you see how they interact; their good days, their bad days, how they work through things—you see the love. I wasn’t brought up like that and I still don’t know to do it. I never saw (my parents’) relationship up-close, so every time I’ve been in a relationship I haven’t known what to do and that’s really scared me.” Sounds like that dude could use a good mentor.

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