Newlyweds Are Creating Strange New Last Names

By


From The New York Times
By Anna Jane Grossman

WHEN Jill Van Camp decided to play catcher in a softball game on the September morning of her wedding, her mother worried that the bride might lose a tooth. Ms. Van Camp, 31, was more concerned about losing her good name. Literally.

She and Darren Bloch, 33, knew they wanted to spend their lives together, but were unsure how to monogram their towels. So they arranged the game between their respective families and friends, and proclaimed that the winning team would determine which of them would take the other’s name.

Thanks to hyphens, a vogue toward creative morphing of names, and legislation in some states that has eased the process for a man to take his wife’s surname, there have never been more surname options.

YourTango’s Take
We didn’t realize that so many options were on the table. We basically thought that you took your husband’s name, hyphenated the two names, or kept your name. And lately we’ve heard of (gasp) husbands taking the wife’s name and a few enterprising couples amalgamating their two names (ohhh, that’s how you get to Bin-Johnson). But now couples are just randomly picking new names. That’s a little kooky. We always assumed that you could class up your first name all you wanted but last names were slightly more immutable. We guess it’s nice that you can change anything about yourself now. But what happens when the kids (and the kids at school) start asking why you’re last name is different from your grandparents, but who cares, right? We suppose Hollywood-types change their name all the time and have to deal with the collateral. Suri Cruise just got company. We know what we’re going to hear after our wedding; “Please let me be the first to introduce Mr. and Mrs. Casanova Viking BeverlyHills.”
We wonder if this trend is approaching an end. Hollywood starlets such as Demi Moore, Eva Longoria, and Sarah Michelle Gellar have recently taken their husbands' names. Check out a Dish from November 16th.
(Quick aside: you’ll notice that the author of the original article’s last name is Grossman, she may have an agenda).

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