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Online Daters Sue Company Because Of Inability To Find A Match

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From ABC.com
By Chris Francescani

A group of well-heeled women who paid up to $1,500 to snag a man through one of the nation's priciest and fast-growing online dating services — It's Just Lunch — has filed a civil lawsuit in Manhattan federal court, claiming the lunchtime setups were not what they bargained for.

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Court papers filed last week portray the company — which has sold IJL franchises to more than 100 matchmaking entrepreneurs in big and small cities across the nation and worldwide — as focused solely on profits, at the expense of matchmaking, and willing to lie to clients to close deals.

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"They lie every step of the way," plaintiff lawyer John Balestriere told ABC News. "They lie to sign up the client. They lie in the initial interview and they lie about the prospective dates."

Tango’s Take
There are a few situations in which you’re not really supposed to ask for your money back. The foremost one that comes to mind is gambling. And online dating has a bit of a gambling element to it. That being said, it looks like IJL (It’s Just Lunch) may not have been putting forth their best effort in all of these cases. Clearly, they are in the business of saying ‘yes’ to virtually everyone. And it may take resources beyond reason to follow up on everything. For instance, if a guy said he was a landscape executive, how would you reasonably prove that he’s not? They could probably hit a database somewhere to check if people are married. All that being said, it is in everyone’s best interest for dating companies to do their level best to get people together with someone they may have a chance of being interested in. And if they absolutely can’t do it, some sort of refund is in order. Maybe they could balance it out by keeping the money of clients that grossly misrepresent themselves. And if you can’t trust someone that’s out to make a profit, who can you trust? And is it a worse policy to just deny service to people that it may be difficult to match? Check out our story on Blackball Dating.

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